James M. Lindsay

The Water's Edge

Lindsay analyzes the politics shaping U.S. foreign policy and the sustainability of American power.

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Showing posts for "Campaign 2012"

Paul Ryan on Foreign Policy

by James M. Lindsay
Mitt Romney claps as vice president select Paul Ryan (R-WI) gives the thumbs up to supporters during a campaign event in Wisconsin. (Shannon Stapleton/courtesy Reuters) Mitt Romney claps as vice president select Paul Ryan (R-WI) gives the thumbs up to supporters during a campaign event in Wisconsin. (Shannon Stapleton/courtesy Reuters)

The weekend’s big news is that Mitt Romney picked Paul Ryan, the chairman of the House Budget Committee, to be his running mate.  Republicans are ecstatic over the choice. So are Democrats. One of the two is mistaken. Read more »

The World Next Week: Clinton Visits Turkey, OIC Meets in Mecca, Climate Changes, and Puerto Rico Votes

by James M. Lindsay
Hillary Clinton arrives in Istanbul in June for a "Friends of Syria" meeting. (Saul Loeb/courtesy Reuters) Hillary Clinton arrives in Istanbul in June for a "Friends of Syria" meeting. (Saul Loeb/courtesy Reuters)

The World Next Week podcast is up. Robert McMahon gave up his seat this week so that Toni Johnson and I could discuss Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit to Turkey; the Organization of Islamic Cooperation’s (OIC) meeting in Mecca; the UN Clean Development Methodology Panel’s meeting in Bonn; and Puerto Rico’s referendum on its political status. Read more »

The World Next Week: Congress’s Recess, Syrian Violence, Hiroshima Anniversary, and NASA’s Mars Mission

by James M. Lindsay
Darkness sets in over the U.S. Capitol building. (Jonathan Ernst/courtesy Reuters) Darkness sets in over the U.S. Capitol building. (Jonathan Ernst/courtesy Reuters)

The World Next Week podcast is up. Bob McMahon and I discussed where things stand in Washington as Congress recesses for the summer; the continued violence in Syria; the 67th anniversary of the Hiroshima atomic bombing; and the upcoming Mars landing of NASA’s rover, Curiosity. Read more »

The World Next Week: Romney Travels, Mercosur Meets, EU Catches Flak, and Apple and Samsung Battle

by James M. Lindsay
Mitt Romney speaks to the press following a meeting with British prime minister David Cameron and British chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne outside 10 Downing Street in London. (Jason Reed/courtesy Reuters) Mitt Romney speaks to the press following a meeting with British prime minister David Cameron and British chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne outside 10 Downing Street in London. (Jason Reed/courtesy Reuters)

The World Next Week podcast is up. Bob McMahon and I discussed Mitt Romney’s foreign trip; Mercosur’s special summit in Rio; anger at the EU’s efforts to make foreign airlines pay for their greenhouse gas emissions; and the Apple-Samsung battle over patents. Read more »

Biden Touts Obama’s Foreign Policy, Bashes Romney’s

by James M. Lindsay
Vice President Joe Biden speaks at New York University on April 26, 2012. (Lucas Jackson/courtesy Reuters) Vice President Joe Biden speaks at New York University on April 26, 2012. (Lucas Jackson/courtesy Reuters)

Joe Biden gets ribbed for being long-winded. But in a speech this morning at New York University he offered a pithy summary of what looks to be the Obama campaign’s “sales pitch” on foreign policy. Read more »

Is Afghanistan a Problem for Mitt Romney?

by James M. Lindsay
A protester affiliated with the anti-war group Code Pink looks into U.S. President Barack Obama's campaign headquarters. (Stephen Lam/courtesy Reuters) A protester affiliated with the anti-war group Code Pink looks into U.S. President Barack Obama's campaign headquarters. (Stephen Lam/courtesy Reuters)

I noted in a post this morning that Americans have less confidence in Mitt Romney than Barack Obama when it comes to foreign policy. Moments after that post went up the Pew Research Center released a new poll.  It shows the challenge Romney faces in closing the gap with the president on foreign policy. Read more »

Do Americans Prefer Romney’s Foreign Policy to Obama’s?

by James M. Lindsay
U.S. Republican presidential candidate and former Governor of Massachusetts Romney speaks during a campaign event in Wilmington, Delaware. (Tim Shaffer/courtesy Reuters) U.S. Republican presidential candidate and former Governor of Massachusetts Romney speaks during a campaign event in Wilmington, Delaware. (Tim Shaffer/courtesy Reuters)

I’ve spent most of my time the past two weeks discharging my administrative responsibilities rather than following the news. With the stack of papers piled in my inbox now looking to be just daunting rather than terrifying, I decided to catch up on the news. So far most of what I have read has been unsurprising. The Syrian government agreed to a cease-fire and then broke it. North Korea promised not to launch a long-range missile and then did just that. Iran offered to talk about a nuclear deal while continuing to intimidate its neighbors.  People behaved badly when they went abroad or visited Las Vegas.  All are essentially dog-bites-man stories. Read more »

Friday File: The Politics of Iran War Fever

by James M. Lindsay
President Barack Obama speaks to reporters on March 6, 2012. During the press conference he criticized his Republican rivals for their rhetoric on Iran. (Larry Downing/courtesy Reuters) President Barack Obama speaks to reporters on March 6, 2012. During the press conference he criticized his Republican rivals for their rhetoric on Iran. (Larry Downing/courtesy Reuters)

Above the Fold. President Obama used his speech to the annual conference of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee last Sunday and his White House press conference to take his critics to task for “beating the drums of war.” The president is certainly right that there has been far too much “loose talk of war.” Problems always look much easier from the vantage point of the campaign trail where “folks don’t have a lot of responsibilities.” Read more »

Friday File: Americans Out of Egypt

by James M. Lindsay
An Egyptian human rights worker sits outside a non-governmental organization in Cairo. (Courtesy Reuters) An Egyptian human rights worker sits outside a non-governmental organization in Cairo. (Courtesy Reuters)

Above the Fold. The six Americans charged with violating Egypt’s civil-society laws finally got to come home last night. The National Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute posted more than $4 million in bail to get the travel ban that the Egyptian government had on their employees lifted. (Germany’s Konrad Adenauer Foundation posted another half a million dollars in bail to get its two employees out of Egypt.) The accused all pledged that they will return to Egypt in April when their trial on charges of failing to register their NGO with the Egyptian government and taking money from a foreign entity is scheduled to resume. Fat chance that happens. Read more »

The World Next Week: Russians, Iranians, and Republicans All Vote

by James M. Lindsay
Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin speaks to supporters and political scientists in Moscow. (courtesy Reuters) Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin speaks to supporters and political scientists in Moscow. (courtesy Reuters)

The World Next Week podcast is up. Bob McMahon and I discussed the presidential election in Russia; the parliamentary elections in Iran; the annual American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) conference; and Super Tuesday. Read more »