Shannon K. O'Neil

Latin America's Moment

O'Neil analyzes developments in Latin America and U.S. relations in the region.

Economic Change on Mexico’s Horizon

by Shannon K. O'Neil Tuesday, March 26, 2013
Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto speaks during the presentation of a telecommunications reform bill in Mexico City March 11, 2013 Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto speaks during the presentation of a telecommunications reform bill in Mexico City March 11, 2013 (Edgard Garrido/Courtesy Reuters).

I spoke last week with CFR’s Brianna Lee about Mexico’s telecommunication, education, tax, and energy reforms, and what they could mean for Mexico’s economic outlook. You can read the interview here or below. Read more »

Mexico and the United States, Two Nations Indivisible

by Shannon K. O'Neil Monday, March 18, 2013
A woman holds a Mexican flag and a U.S. flag at a May Day rally for immigrants' and workers' rights in Portland, Oregon, May 1, 2007. A woman holds a Mexican flag and a U.S. flag at a May Day rally for immigrants' and workers' rights in Portland, Oregon, May 1, 2007 (Richard Clement/Courtesy Reuters).

Mexico and the United States are linked closer than ever through trade, bi-national communities, security concerns, and a shared democratic vision. In this interview with Emerging Markets, I spoke with Antonia Oprita about what the challenges and opportunities are for the relationship and why it matters so much for both countries. For a more in-depth analysis, check out my new book, Two Nations Indivisible: Mexico, the United States, and the Road Ahead. Read more »

Mexico’s Road to Economic Sanity

by Shannon K. O'Neil Friday, March 15, 2013
View of the headquarters of Mexican telephone company Telmex in Mexico City January 7, 2010. View of the headquarters of Mexican telephone company Telmex in Mexico City January 7, 2010.

President Enrique Peña Nieto and his administration presented a telecommunications bill earlier this week that would, if fully implemented, make sweeping changes throughout the sector. In this op-ed that I published for Fortune, I look at what the bill may mean for Carlos Slim and Mexico’s other moguls, as well as for the country’s overall development. Read more »

A Seamless North American Market

by Shannon K. O'Neil Tuesday, March 12, 2013
U.S. Customs and Border Patrol officers inspect vehicles entering the United States from Mexico at the San Ysidro boarding crossing in San Ysidro, California, March 1, 2013. (Mike Blake/Courtesy Reuters). U.S. Customs and Border Patrol officers inspect vehicles entering the United States from Mexico at the San Ysidro boarding crossing in San Ysidro, California, March 1, 2013. (Mike Blake/Courtesy Reuters).

The Council on Foreign Relations released a new policy innovation memorandum today by American University professor Bob Pastor. The paper, “Shortcut to U.S. Economic Competitiveness: A Seamless North American Market,” puts forth a plan for the United States’ economic recovery that depends on America’s neighbors and closest economic partners—Mexico and Canada. Read more »

New Era for U.S.-Venezuela Relations?

by Shannon K. O'Neil Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Venezuelan Vice President Nicolas Maduro (C) greets supporters next to his wife Cilia Flores (R) during a parade to commemorate the 21st anniversary of President Hugo Chavez's attempted coup d'etat in Caracas (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Courtesy Reuters). Venezuelan Vice President Nicolas Maduro (C) greets supporters next to his wife Cilia Flores (R) during a parade to commemorate the 21st anniversary of President Hugo Chavez's attempted coup d'etat in Caracas (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Courtesy Reuters).

Much of the discussion surrounding Chavez’s passing has focused on what his absence will mean for Venezuela’s internal politics, but below is my take for the BBC on how it may affect U.S.-Venezuela relations. You can also read the article here. Read more »

Chávez Loses Battle to Cancer

by Shannon K. O'Neil Tuesday, March 5, 2013
Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez waves to supporters during his arrival at Toncontin airport in Tegucigalpa (Edgard Garrido/Courtesy Reuters) Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez waves to supporters during his arrival at Toncontin airport in Tegucigalpa (Edgard Garrido/Courtesy Reuters)

After fourteen years in power, Vice President Nicolás Maduro announced this evening that President Hugo Chávez had lost his long and secretive battle with cancer. Chávez’s legacy will surely be mixed, as he leaves a divided political class and precarious economic situation, but his policies and Chavismo will likely live on. I spoke tonight with Marcus Mabry from the New York Times about what his death could mean for Venezuela, Latin America, and the United States—you can watch the video here.