Shannon K. O'Neil

Latin America's Moment

O'Neil analyzes developments in Latin America and U.S. relations in the region.

A Primer: Mexico’s Energy Reform

by Shannon K. O'Neil Thursday, March 20, 2014
Employees walk on a bridge at the Mexico’s state-run oil monopoly Pemex platform “Ku Maloob Zaap” in the Northeast Marine Region of Pemex Exploration and Production in the Bay of Campeche April 19, 2013 (Victor Ruiz/Courtesy Reuters). Employees walk on a bridge at the Mexico’s state-run oil monopoly Pemex platform “Ku Maloob Zaap” in the Northeast Marine Region of Pemex Exploration and Production in the Bay of Campeche April 19, 2013 (Victor Ruiz/Courtesy Reuters).

This past December, Mexico passed a historic energy reform that has the potential to fundamentally transform the country’s oil, gas, and electricity sectors. In this brief that I co-authored with James Taylor, founding partner at Vianovo, we lay out the importance of the soon-to-be-announced secondary legislation, provide an outline of the newly formed regulatory regime, and explore the types of opportunities that the reform will create. Read more »

This Year’s Presidential Elections in Latin America

by Shannon K. O'Neil Thursday, March 13, 2014
Voters wait in line to cast their vote in a presidential election runoff at a polling station outside in San Salvador March 9, 2014 (Henry Romero/Courtesy Reuters). Voters wait in line to cast their vote in a presidential election runoff at a polling station outside in San Salvador March 9, 2014 (Henry Romero/Courtesy Reuters).

Earlier this week, Salvadorans headed to the polls to cast their ballots in a presidential runoff election, since on February 2 the candidates failed to reach the 50 percent threshold to avoid a second round. In the runoff’s lead up, Salvador Sánchez Cerén, a former guerrilla commander and the current vice president from the ruling party, looked poised for an easy win over his closest opponent Norman Quijano from the conservative Nationalist Republican Alliance (ARENA). But with the final ballot count separating the candidates by some 0.2 percent of the votes and with allegations of fraud, it seems that the protests and debates surrounding this election are far from over. Read more »