Stewart M. Patrick

The Internationalist

Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

South Korea: Middle Power Ambitions and Geopolitical Constraints

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick Tuesday, June 30, 2015
South Korean President Park Geun-hye shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing, China, on November 10, 2014. South Korean President Park Geun-hye shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing, China, on November 10, 2014 (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters).

The following is a guest post by Andrew O’Neil, professor of political science and head of the School of Government and International Relations at Griffith University, Australia. Read more »

International Cooperation: Still Alive and Kicking

by Stewart M. Patrick Thursday, June 25, 2015
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with the leaders of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) countries in Beijing, China, on November 10, 2014. U.S. President Barack Obama meets with the leaders of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) countries in Beijing, China, on November 10, 2014 (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters).

The following is a guest post by Naomi Egelresearch associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program.

Earlier this month, the International Institutions and Global Governance program cohosted the Princeton Workshop on Global Governance, which brought together scholars and practitioners to assess geopolitics and global cooperation. The main takeaway: international cooperation may be messy and it may be taking new forms, but it’s not going anywhere. Read more »

The Vatican Takes on Climate Change: Making Sense of the Pope’s Encyclical

by Stewart M. Patrick Thursday, June 18, 2015
Pope Francis waves to a crowd on St. Peter's Square in Vatican City on June 13, 2015. Pope Francis waves to a crowd on St. Peter's Square in Vatican City on June 13, 2015 (Giampiero Sposito/Reuters).

Pope Francis’s new encyclical on the environment, “Laudato Si” (“Praise Be to You”), is a profoundly important document. It has the potential to shake up the stalled climate change debate in the United States, not least by broadening the definition of what it means to be a “conservative.” Read more »

The G7 Summit: An Exclusive Club—But a Global Role

by Stewart M. Patrick Wednesday, June 3, 2015
A view of the Bavarian retreat of Schloss Elmau, where leaders of the Group of Seven (G7) countries will gather for their annual summit on June 7–8, 2015. A view of the Bavarian retreat of Schloss Elmau, where leaders of the Group of Seven (G7) countries will gather for their annual summit on June 7–8, 2015 (Michaela Rehle/Reuters).

When President Obama and his fellow Group of Seven (G7) leaders convene this weekend at the Bavarian retreat of Schloss Elmau, they will face two tasks. The most obvious is to formulate common positions on a global agenda so sweeping that it will strain even the lengthiest communiqué. Their more subtle challenge is to signal that their advanced market democracies remain not only an anchor of order in a turbulent world but also a potential engine to drive global governance reform. Read more »

The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Impact on Global Health

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick Tuesday, May 26, 2015
An aerial banner reading "Doctors to Obama: Keep #TPP Away from Our Medicines!" flies above New York in January 2015. The banner was sponsored by the international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières, or Doctors Without Borders, which has argued that the Trans-Pacific Partnership could restrict access to affordable generic medicines in developing countries. An aerial banner reading "Doctors to Obama: Keep #TPP Away from Our Medicines!" flies above New York in January 2015. The demonstration was sponsored by the international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières, or Doctors Without Borders, which has argued that the Trans-Pacific Partnership could restrict access to affordable generic medicines in developing countries (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters).

The following is a guest post by my colleague Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »

The Health of Nations: The WHO’s Moment of Truth

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick Thursday, May 21, 2015
World Health Organisation Director-General Margaret Chan gestures during her address to the 68th World Health Assembly at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, May 18, 2015 (Denis Balibouse/Courtesy: Reuters). World Health Organisation Director-General Margaret Chan gestures during her address to the 68th World Health Assembly at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, May 18, 2015 (Denis Balibouse/Courtesy: Reuters).

Coauthored with Daniel Chardell, research associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa underscored how vulnerable the world has become to infectious disease—and how vital it is to invest in global health security. Not since the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 had an epidemic garnered so much attention—and inspired so much fear—worldwide. But this window is closing fast. As Ebola has waned in West Africa, so has the political momentum for reforming the World Health Organization (WHO). The World Health Assembly (WHA), which opened Monday in Geneva, offers what may be the last chance to restore the badly tarnished credibility of the WHO and preserve its central role in pandemic preparedness and response. Read more »

The NPT Review Conference: Setting Realistic Expectations

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick Wednesday, April 29, 2015
A mushroom cloud rises over Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945. A mushroom cloud rises over Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945 (Ho New/Courtesy Reuters/U.S. Air Force).

Coauthored with Naomi Egel, research associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »

Earth Gets Its Day: When Will It Get Its Due?

by Stewart M. Patrick Wednesday, April 22, 2015
A photo of Earth—dubbed "Earthrise"—taken by U.S. astronaut William Anders during the Apollo 8 mission in December 1968. A photo of Earth—dubbed "Earthrise"—taken by U.S. astronaut William Anders during the Apollo 8 mission in December 1968 (William Anders/Courtesy NASA).

Earth Day 2015 finds the planet in dire straits. Future generations will mock the inanity of designating a single day each year to honor the Earth while despoiling the planet on which human well-being depended.

The World Bank warns that temperatures will almost certainly rise by 1.5 degrees Celsius by midcentury. The consequences will be dramatic and likely devastating. Glaciers will disappear,ice sheets will melt, sea levels will rise, oceans will acidify, coral reefs will die, fish stocks will collapse, droughts will intensify, storms will strengthen. Global averages, moreover, will conceal dramatic local swings in temperature. Under current climate scenarios, global warming will make many current population centers uninhabitable, causing mass migrations. According to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees’ office, even by the most conservative predictions, extreme weather will displace up to 250 million people by midcentury. Read more »

Senator Rubio and U.S. “Leadership”: Three Questions for the Candidate

by Stewart M. Patrick Thursday, April 16, 2015
U.S. Senator Marco Rubio announces his 2016 presidential campaign at the Freedom Tower in Miami, Florida, on April 13, 2015. U.S. Senator Marco Rubio announces his 2016 presidential campaign at the Freedom Tower in Miami, Florida, on April 13, 2015 (Joe Skipper/Courtesy Reuters).

The decision by Marco Rubio to seek the Republican presidential nomination is audacious. But it would be a mistake to underestimate the first-term senator from Florida. As the current occupant of the White House attests, a thin political resume is no barrier to the highest office in the land when you have charisma and a compelling biography. Read more »

Pharmaceuticals in Global Health Security

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick Thursday, April 2, 2015
An Ebola trials notebook is seen in a laboratory during trials for an Ebola vaccine at the Jenner Institute in Oxford, England, on January 16, 2015. An Ebola trials notebook is seen in a laboratory during trials for an Ebola vaccine at the Jenner Institute in Oxford, England, on January 16, 2015 (Eddie Keogh/Courtesy Reuters).

The following is a guest post by my colleague Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »