Stewart M. Patrick

The Internationalist

Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

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Showing 0 - 4 of 4 results for "Lagon Libya"

Guest Post: Libya’s Lessons for Global Governance

by Stewart M. Patrick

A Libyan man attends the Friday prayer near a courthouse in Benghazi. (Esam Al-Fetori/ Courtesy Reuters).

After a mixed-bag of news coming from Libya this week, numerous questions have emerged regarding international interventions both in Libya and elsewhere.  My colleague, Mark P. Lagon, adjunct senior fellow in human rights at the Council on Foreign Relations and international relations chair for Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program, offers his assessment.

Lawyers often say, “Hard cases make bad law.”   Yet the hard case of Libya raises important questions and lessons on meaningful global governance today. 

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Pluralism, Peace, and the “Responsibility to Innovate”

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Former President Ronald Reagan addresses a crowd at the opening of the Reagan Library in Simi, California, November 4, 1991 (Gary Cameron/Courtesy Reuters). Former President Ronald Reagan addresses a crowd at the opening of the Reagan Library in Simi, California, November 4, 1991 (Gary Cameron/Courtesy Reuters).

Below is a guest post by Mark P. Lagon, adjunct senior fellow for human rights at the Council on Foreign Relations and professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. Read more »

Guest Post: Indirect Intervention—Why and When

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Residents attend the funeral of Abdelaziz, 23, a sergeant who defected to join the Free Syrian Army, on the outskirts of Idlib province July 25, 2012. Abdelaziz was tortured and killed by Syria's President Bashar al-Assad's forces after he was captured at a checkpoint, according to the people who attended the funeral (Obeida Al Naimi/Courtesy Reuters). Residents attend the funeral of Abdelaziz, 23, a sergeant who defected to join the Free Syrian Army, on the outskirts of Idlib province July 25, 2012. Abdelaziz was tortured and killed by Syria's President Bashar al-Assad's forces after he was captured at a checkpoint, according to the people who attended the funeral (Obeida Al Naimi/Courtesy Reuters).

Here is a guest blog by my colleague Mark P. Lagon, adjunct senior fellow for human rights at the Council, as well as international relations and security chair at Georgetown University’s Master of Science in Foreign Service program. Read more »