Stewart M. Patrick

The Internationalist

Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

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Showing posts for "Europe"

Inequality and the Rise of Authoritarianism: International Studies Association Panel

by Stewart M. Patrick
Demonstrators supporting Brexit protest outside of the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain. (Toby Melville/Reuters)

As part of CFR’s Academic Outreach Initiative, I recently had the privilege of moderating a panel on inequality and the rise of authoritarianism with Jack A. Goldstone, Virginia E. and John T. Hazel professor of public policy at George Mason University; Shadi Hamid, senior fellow in the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World, the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution; and Kate McNamara, professor of government and foreign service at Georgetown University, and 2016–2017 distinguished scholar in residence at American University’s School of International Service. The panel was held at the International Studies Association annual convention in Baltimore, Maryland, on February 15. Read more »

The Scottish Play: Will Brexit Spell the End of a United Kingdom?

by Stewart M. Patrick
Nicola Sturgeon, the First Minister of Scotland, smiles during a EU referendum Remain event, at Edinburgh airport in Edinburgh, Scotland, Britain June 22, 2016. (Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

The decision by British voters last June to leave the European Union (EU) has thrown that bloc into turmoil. But its implications for Great Britain could be even more profound, portending the dissolution of the United Kingdom. Prime Minister Theresa May could trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty as early as March 15, starting the two-year timetable for negotiating the terms of the UK’s divorce from the EU. The prime minister should beware the Ides of March: It seems all but inevitable that Scotland’s government will respond by calling for a second referendum on Scottish independence. The ultimate result could be the reemergence of a sovereign Scotland, more than three hundred years after the Acts of Union (1706–1707) united the cross of St. Andrew and the cross of St. George. Read more »

Steering a World in Disarray: Ten Summits to Watch in 2017

by Stewart M. Patrick
Leaders pose for pictures during the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China. (Damir Sagolj/Reuters)

After a tumultuous 2016, the world holds its breath for what the coming year may bring. Angry populism is on the march. Great power relations are tense. The Middle East has imploded. Meanwhile, President-Elect Donald J. Trump proposes to upend U.S. foreign policy in areas from trade to climate, alliances to nonproliferation, terrorism to human rights. In a world in disarray, can multilateralism deliver? Ten major summits during 2017 will help provide an answer. Here’s what to look for at each. Read more »

International (Non-)Cooperation in a Changing World Order

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
U.S. President Barack Obama extends his hand to Russian President Vladimir Putin during their meeting at the United Nations General Assembly in New York on September 28, 2015. U.S. President Barack Obama extends his hand to Russian President Vladimir Putin during their meeting at the United Nations General Assembly in New York on September 28, 2015 (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters).

The following is a guest post by Terrence Mullan, program coordinator of the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »

Brexit, Pursued by a Bear: NATO’s Enduring Relevance

by Stewart M. Patrick
Polish, U.S., and British flags are seen during the NATO allies' Anakonda 16 exercise near Torun, Poland, on June 7, 2016. Polish, U.S., and British flags are seen during the NATO allies' Anakonda 16 exercise near Torun, Poland, on June 7, 2016 (Kacper Pempel/Reuters).

The British public’s momentous decision two weeks ago to quit the European Union (EU) continues to reverberate globally. But its geopolitical implications should not be exaggerated. Brexit poses an institutional crisis for the European Union. But it hardly indicates the impending “collapse of the liberal world order,” as some pundits fret. This weekend’s Warsaw summit will remind the world—and Vladimir Putin—that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) remains the real anchor of Western defense, and that the solidarity of the transatlantic alliance need not depend on the fortunes of the European project. Read more »

A Victory for Little England—and National Sovereignty

by Stewart M. Patrick
Boris Johnson, the former mayor of London and champion of the "Leave" campaign, speaks during a rally in Manchester, England, on April 15, 2016. Boris Johnson, the former mayor of London and champion of the "Leave" campaign, speaks during a rally in Manchester, England, on April 15, 2016 (Andrew Yates/Reuters).

The shocking victory of the “Leave” campaign in Thursday’s referendum was a massive repudiation of the elite-driven European project and a testament to the enduring pull of national sovereignty in an age of global anxiety. It is a momentous decision that will reverberate well beyond the British Isles. Besides posing an immediate, existential crisis for the European Union and the United Kingdom itself, the outcome will embolden skeptics of international institutions and multilateral cooperation in the United States. Read more »