Stewart M. Patrick

The Internationalist

Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

Posts by Category

Showing posts for "G8 and G20"

A New Year’s Agenda for Russia’s G20 Chairmanship

by Stewart M. Patrick
St Petersburg, Russia will be the site of the next G20 meeting Fireworks light up the sky over the Neva River and Peter and Pawel Fortress in St. Petersburg, the site of the next G20 meeting. (Alexander Demianchuk/ Courtesy Reuters)

The new year is a time of hope. As 2013 dawns, optimists yearn for a period of sustained global economic growth after five years of recession, turbulence, and sluggish recovery. Achieving this scenario will require close policy coordination among governments of the world’s major economies. This places a heavy burden on the Russian Federation, which on December 1 assumed the rotating chairmanship of the Group of Twenty (G20). Read more »

A New Agenda for the G20: Addressing Fragile States

by Stewart M. Patrick
People walk along Red Square, with Saint Basil's Cathedral in the background, in central Moscow where the G20 summit  will be held later this year. (Denis Sinyakov/Courtesy Reuters) People walk along Red Square, with Saint Basil's Cathedral in the background, in central Moscow where the G20 summit will be held later this year. (Denis Sinyakov/Courtesy Reuters)

– Moscow

Having recently assumed the rotating chair of the Group of Twenty (G20), the Russian government is now soliciting input on the agenda for its September 2013 meeting in St. Petersburg. Yesterday I contributed to these deliberations as a member of the “Think20”network—a consortium of independent experts from around the world. My own advice to the Russian sherpa, Ksenia Yudaeva, was that Russia should transform the G20’s nascent development agenda to address the pressing challenge of fragile states. Read more »

Korea Goes Global: And We Mean Security (Not Gangnam Style)

by Stewart M. Patrick
South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak (R) speaks to members of his delegation while awaiting the start of a meeting on the second day of the G20 Summit in Cannes November 4, 2011 (Dylan Martinez/Courtesy Reuters). South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak (R) speaks to members of his delegation while awaiting the start of a meeting on the second day of the G20 Summit in Cannes November 4, 2011 (Dylan Martinez/Courtesy Reuters).

When one thinks of the world’s emerging powers, the mind is naturally drawn to large, sprawling developing countries like China, India, or Brazil. But there’s another dynamo we often overlook that’s increasingly making its global mark—South Korea. Despite the global downturn of the past several years, the ROK’s economy has grown at an impressive clip, becoming the world’s thirteenth largest in nominal terms. South Korea is also flexing its diplomatic muscles within the Group of Twenty (G20) and other forums, seeking to bridge entrenched divides between the global North and South, East and West. Its most impressive role, however, may be its increasing role in promoting international peace and security well beyond the Korean Peninsula. Read more »

A Contrarian’s Take on the Global Financial Crisis: The System Worked

by Stewart M. Patrick
U.S. President Barack Obama (top, R) speaks as (L-R, from bottom L) Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, Italy's Prime Minister Mario Monti, Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper, French President Francois Hollande, Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron, Russia's Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev as well as European Council President Herman Van Rompuy (L, Foreground) and Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel (R, foreground) listen at the start of the first working session of the G8 Summit at Camp David, Maryland, May 19, 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/ Andrew Winning). U.S. President Barack Obama (top, R) speaks as (L-R, from bottom L) Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, Italy's Prime Minister Mario Monti, Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper, French President Francois Hollande, Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron, Russia's Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev as well as European Council President Herman Van Rompuy (L, Foreground) and Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel (R, foreground) listen at the start of the first working session of the G8 Summit at Camp David, Maryland, May 19, 2012 (Courtesy Reuters/ Andrew Winning).

If there’s one lesson observers have drawn from the “greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression,” it’s that our outdated system of global economic governance failed to respond and needs a major overhaul. A closer look at the performance of international institutions since 2008, however, paints a rosier picture. Contrary to conventional wisdom, Tufts professor Dan Drezner argues in a provocative new CFR working paper that “the system worked.” Despite dire predictions, major economic powers cooperated within multilateral institutions, both old and new, to prevent a global financial collapse, forestall a descent into tit-for-tat protectionism, adopt new rules of financial regulation, and adjust the governance structures of global bodies to reflect power shifts. Read more »

Obama, Putin, and Syria: The Makings of a Deal?

by Stewart M. Patrick
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in Los Cabos, Mexico, June 18, 2012 (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters). U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in Los Cabos, Mexico, June 18, 2012 (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters).

As often happens at G20 summits, the major diplomatic action in Los Cabos is taking place not in plenary sessions devoted to the world economy, but in discreet conversations between world leaders. Witness the bilateral meeting yesterday between presidents Obama and Putin over the deteriorating situation in Syria. That conversation suggested the outlines of a potential breakthrough, as both sides stare into the abyss of an all-out Syrian civil war. In their closing statement, Obama and Putin committed to the common goal of a “political transition to a democratic, pluralistic political system that would be implemented by the Syrians themselves.” Making tangible progress toward this objective will require restraint on the part of the Obama administration, and the stomach to grant Putin the outsized diplomatic role he craves as mediator. Read more »

The G20 and the Eurozone Crisis

by Stewart M. Patrick
Germany's Chancellor Merkel and U.S. President Obama discuss before a meeting on the second day of the G20 Summit in Cannes (Kevin Lamarque/Courtesy Reuters) Germany's Chancellor Merkel and U.S. President Obama discuss before a meeting on the second day of the G20 Summit in Cannes (Kevin Lamarque/Courtesy Reuters)

On Sunday, one day after Greeks vote in elections that may result in their withdrawal from the eurozone, and throw that single currency union into untested waters, leaders from the world’s twenty largest economies will gather in Los Cabos, Mexico, at the Group of Twenty (G20) summit. The eurozone crisis will undoubtedly dominate, but under the surface there are important issues of global cooperation that the leaders must not forget. Read more »

The G20 Mexico Summit

by Stewart M. Patrick
Mexican President Felipe Calderon speaks to members of the G20 during a G20 Sherpas' meeting at Los Pinos Presidential Palace in Mexico City, February 3, 2012 (Bernardo Montoya/Courtesy Reuters). Mexican President Felipe Calderon speaks to members of the G20 during a G20 Sherpas' meeting at Los Pinos Presidential Palace in Mexico City, February 3, 2012 (Bernardo Montoya/Courtesy Reuters).

World leaders will gather June 18-20 in Los Cabos, Mexico, for the Group of Twenty nations summit. Watch the Internationalist interview below with Enrique Berruga, the president of the Mexican Council on Foreign Relations, about the upcoming meeting and future of the group. Read more »

The G8 Summit at Camp David: A Talk in the Woods

by Stewart M. Patrick
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (L) speaks with U.S. President Barack Obama during a round table meeting at the G8 summit in Deauville May 27, 2011. (Pool/Courtesy Reuters) Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (L) speaks with U.S. President Barack Obama during a round table meeting at the G8 summit in Deauville May 27, 2011. (Pool/Courtesy Reuters)

After so many splashy summits, President Obama’s decision to hold this year’s Group of Eight (G8) meeting at Camp David is inspired. The success of leaders-level meetings depends, above all, on opportunities for candid conversation away from media flashbulbs and crowded convention halls. The secluded setting—nestled in Maryland’s Catoctin Mountains—will provide a welcome intimacy to deliberations among leaders of the world’s advanced market democracies. Given their daunting global agenda, they can certainly use the peace and quiet. Read more »

The View From Brazil

by Stewart M. Patrick
Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer unveils its new EMBRAER 190 regional jet, which will be able to carry up to one hundred passengers, in Sao Jose dos Campos, February 9, 2004. (Paulo Whitaker/Courtesy Reuters) Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer unveils its new EMBRAER 190 regional jet, which will be able to carry up to one hundred passengers, in Sao Jose dos Campos, February 9, 2004. (Paulo Whitaker/Courtesy Reuters)

After emerging from the 2008 financial crisis relatively unscathed, Brazil’s inevitable entrance into the club of major global powers is increasingly accepted. The Internationalist and Carlos Simonsen Leal of the Brazilian Getulio Vargas Foundation discuss Brazil’s perspective on global finance and international security. Simonsen says: Read more »

The G20: What We Thinktank It Should Do

by Stewart M. Patrick
Speakers, including Stewart Patrick, at the Mexican Think20 meeting. Speakers, including Stewart Patrick, at the Mexican Think20 meeting.

As host of this year’s Group of Twenty (G20) summit, the Mexican government is diligently finalizing the agenda that world leaders will consider in Los Cabos (June 18-19). Earlier this week I was in sunny Mexico City, helping advise Mexico’s G20 sherpa, Deputy Foreign Minister Lourdes Aranda, on summit priorities. I did so as part of a new “Think20” network of think tank experts from around the world—the brainchild of the Canadian Center for International Governance Innovation (CIGI). The consultation, cohosted by the Mexican Foreign Ministry and the Mexican Council on Foreign Relations (COMEXI), offered a rare chance to weigh in on the future of the world’s “premier forum for global economic coordination.”  The G20 has a tall task ahead of it, and needs to focus its agenda. Here’s the Internationalist’s take on its priorities for Los Cabos: Read more »