Stewart M. Patrick

The Internationalist

Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

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The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Impact on Global Health

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
An aerial banner reading "Doctors to Obama: Keep #TPP Away from Our Medicines!" flies above New York in January 2015. The banner was sponsored by the international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières, or Doctors Without Borders, which has argued that the Trans-Pacific Partnership could restrict access to affordable generic medicines in developing countries. An aerial banner reading "Doctors to Obama: Keep #TPP Away from Our Medicines!" flies above New York in January 2015. The demonstration was sponsored by the international medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières, or Doctors Without Borders, which has argued that the Trans-Pacific Partnership could restrict access to affordable generic medicines in developing countries (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters).

The following is a guest post by my colleague Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »

The Health of Nations: The WHO’s Moment of Truth

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
World Health Organisation Director-General Margaret Chan gestures during her address to the 68th World Health Assembly at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, May 18, 2015 (Denis Balibouse/Courtesy: Reuters). World Health Organisation Director-General Margaret Chan gestures during her address to the 68th World Health Assembly at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, May 18, 2015 (Denis Balibouse/Courtesy: Reuters).

Coauthored with Daniel Chardell, research associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa underscored how vulnerable the world has become to infectious disease—and how vital it is to invest in global health security. Not since the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 had an epidemic garnered so much attention—and inspired so much fear—worldwide. But this window is closing fast. As Ebola has waned in West Africa, so has the political momentum for reforming the World Health Organization (WHO). The World Health Assembly (WHA), which opened Monday in Geneva, offers what may be the last chance to restore the badly tarnished credibility of the WHO and preserve its central role in pandemic preparedness and response. Read more »

Pharmaceuticals in Global Health Security

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
An Ebola trials notebook is seen in a laboratory during trials for an Ebola vaccine at the Jenner Institute in Oxford, England, on January 16, 2015. An Ebola trials notebook is seen in a laboratory during trials for an Ebola vaccine at the Jenner Institute in Oxford, England, on January 16, 2015 (Eddie Keogh/Courtesy Reuters).

The following is a guest post by my colleague Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »

Understanding a Framework Convention on Global Health

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
A Sierra Leonean soldier walks past protective clothing drying on a fence in the Ebola Training Academy in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on December 16, 2014. A Sierra Leonean soldier walks past protective clothing drying on a fence in the Ebola Training Academy in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on December 16, 2014 (Baz Ratner/Courtesy Reuters).

The following is a guest post by my colleague Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations.

For years, a group of global health scholars and practitioners have been pushing for the idea of a legally binding global health treaty—a framework convention on global health (FCGH). Grounded in the right to health, FCGH is anticipated to close the health gap between and within countries. The 2014 Ebola outbreak has highlighted the health disadvantages experienced by marginalized and poor populations in West Africa. Last week, Lawrence Gostin, University Professor and founding O’Neill Chair in Global Health Law at Georgetown University, and Lance Gable, associate dean for academic affairs and associate professor of law at Wayne State University, visited the Council on Foreign Relations to share their views on the prospects for FCGH and what it could accomplish in the realm of global health governance. Listen to this podcast for a “to-the-point” discussion of these issues and the important insights of Professors Gostin and Gable. Read more »

Course Correction: WHO Reform after Ebola

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Margaret Chan addresses the media during the Executive Board's special session on Ebola on January 25, 2015. World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Margaret Chan addresses the media during the Executive Board's special session on Ebola on January 25, 2015 (Pierre Albouy/Courtesy Reuters).

Coauthored with Daniel Chardell, research associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »

A Massive Humanitarian Failure in Syria

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
A Syrian girl carries bread in the Bab al-Salam refugee camp in Azaz, near the Syrian-Turkish border, October 27, 2014. A Syrian girl carries bread in the Bab al-Salam refugee camp in Azaz, near the Syrian-Turkish border, October 27, 2014 (Hosam Katan/Courtesy Reuters).

Coauthored with Shervin Ghaffari, intern in the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »

Meeting Halfway: Nuclear Weapon States and the Humanitarian Disarmament Initiative

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Anti-nuclear weapons demonstrators protest in New York ahead of the May 2010 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference. Anti-nuclear weapons demonstrators protest in New York ahead of the May 2010 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference (Chip East/Courtesy Reuters).

Below is a guest post by Naomi Egelresearch associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »

Could the BRICS Bank Make China More Responsible?

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Leaders of the BRICS countries—Russian President Vladimir Putin, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Chinese President Xi Jinping, and South African President Jacob Zuma—pose during the BRICS summit in Fortaleza, Brazil, on July 15, 2014. Leaders of the BRICS countries—Russian President Vladimir Putin, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Chinese President Xi Jinping, and South African President Jacob Zuma—pose during the BRICS summit in Fortaleza, Brazil, on July 15, 2014 (Nacho Doce/Courtesy Reuters).

Below is a guest post by Isabella Bennett, assistant director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »

Extracting Justice: Battling Corruption in Resource-Rich Africa

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Local residents' clothes dry over the gas pipelines running through the Eleme community near the city of Port Harcourt, a major Nigerian oil hub in the country's southeast. Local residents' clothes dry over the gas pipelines running through the Eleme community near the city of Port Harcourt, a major Nigerian oil hub in the country's southeast (Akintunde Akinleye/Courtesy Reuters).

Coauthored with Isabella Bennett, assistant director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »

Dignity as Global Institutions’ Mission: A New Consensus?

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Children of Dalits—also known as "untouchables"—are seen in the outskirts of the northern Indian city of Lucknow. Children of Dalits—also known as "untouchables"—are seen in the outskirts of the northern Indian city of Lucknow (Pawan Kumar/Courtesy Reuters).

In global governance, there are a couple of nettlesome questions of scope. First, how broadly should universal human rights norms be defined? For instance, one could focus on political and civil rights, or one could also include socioeconomic rights and prosperity. Second, how widely should the world look for actors and partners to implement those norms? Beyond looking at public institutions—whether national or multilateral—global solutions may require contributions from nongovernmental and corporate actors. These are the two basic questions that my colleague at the Council on Foreign Relations and Georgetown University, Mark P. Lagon, addresses in his book forthcoming in October, Human Dignity and the Future of Global Institutions, co-edited with Anthony Clark Arend. Lagon has written the following guest post on these important questions on which we work together in CFR’s International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »