Stewart M. Patrick

The Internationalist

Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

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Showing posts for "Guest Post"

A Massive Humanitarian Failure in Syria

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
A Syrian girl carries bread in the Bab al-Salam refugee camp in Azaz, near the Syrian-Turkish border, October 27, 2014. A Syrian girl carries bread in the Bab al-Salam refugee camp in Azaz, near the Syrian-Turkish border, October 27, 2014 (Hosam Katan/Courtesy Reuters).

Coauthored with Shervin Ghaffari, intern in the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations. Read more »

Meeting Halfway: Nuclear Weapon States and the Humanitarian Disarmament Initiative

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Anti-nuclear weapons demonstrators protest in New York ahead of the May 2010 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference. Anti-nuclear weapons demonstrators protest in New York ahead of the May 2010 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference (Chip East/Courtesy Reuters).

Below is a guest post by Naomi Egelresearch associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »

Could the BRICS Bank Make China More Responsible?

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Leaders of the BRICS countries—Russian President Vladimir Putin, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Chinese President Xi Jinping, and South African President Jacob Zuma—pose during the BRICS summit in Fortaleza, Brazil, on July 15, 2014. Leaders of the BRICS countries—Russian President Vladimir Putin, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Chinese President Xi Jinping, and South African President Jacob Zuma—pose during the BRICS summit in Fortaleza, Brazil, on July 15, 2014 (Nacho Doce/Courtesy Reuters).

Below is a guest post by Isabella Bennett, assistant director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »

Extracting Justice: Battling Corruption in Resource-Rich Africa

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Local residents' clothes dry over the gas pipelines running through the Eleme community near the city of Port Harcourt, a major Nigerian oil hub in the country's southeast. Local residents' clothes dry over the gas pipelines running through the Eleme community near the city of Port Harcourt, a major Nigerian oil hub in the country's southeast (Akintunde Akinleye/Courtesy Reuters).

Coauthored with Isabella Bennett, assistant director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »

Dignity as Global Institutions’ Mission: A New Consensus?

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Children of Dalits—also known as "untouchables"—are seen in the outskirts of the northern Indian city of Lucknow. Children of Dalits—also known as "untouchables"—are seen in the outskirts of the northern Indian city of Lucknow (Pawan Kumar/Courtesy Reuters).

In global governance, there are a couple of nettlesome questions of scope. First, how broadly should universal human rights norms be defined? For instance, one could focus on political and civil rights, or one could also include socioeconomic rights and prosperity. Second, how widely should the world look for actors and partners to implement those norms? Beyond looking at public institutions—whether national or multilateral—global solutions may require contributions from nongovernmental and corporate actors. These are the two basic questions that my colleague at the Council on Foreign Relations and Georgetown University, Mark P. Lagon, addresses in his book forthcoming in October, Human Dignity and the Future of Global Institutions, co-edited with Anthony Clark Arend. Lagon has written the following guest post on these important questions on which we work together in CFR’s International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »

The New “Space Race” for Civil Society and Democracy

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Egyptian activists accused of working for outlawed non-governmental organizations stand trial in Cairo in February 2014. Egyptian activists accused of working for outlawed non-governmental organizations stand trial in Cairo in February 2014 (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Courtesy Reuters).

Civil society plays a central role in securing and upholding democratic governance worldwide. However, from Egypt to Russia, authoritarian governments are reverse engineering civil society’s tactics, threatening to undermine the campaign for liberal rule. As civil society fights for space in which to dissent, rally for reform, and express itself freely, illiberal states are squeezing that space. My colleague Mark P. Lagon, adjunct senior fellow for human rights at the Council on Foreign Relations and professor at Georgetown University, calls this the “new space race” in his just-released CFR Expert Brief, “Fighting for Civil Society’s Space.” He recommends an approach to global diplomacy to ensure open space for reformers. Here’s an excerpt. Read more »

Winter is Coming: Beyond the IMF-World Bank Spring Meetings, an Unfinished Battle for Reform

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde enters the opening of a news conference in Washington April 10, 2014 (Gary Cameron/Courtesy Reuters). International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde enters the opening of a news conference in Washington April 10, 2014 (Gary Cameron/Courtesy Reuters).

Below is a guest post by Claire Schachterresearch associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program.

The Spring Meetings of the IMF and World Bank Group are underway in Washington, DC. The world’s top finance officials are painting the brightest picture of the global economy since the 2008 financial crisis: global growth is picking up, the United States’ recovery is gaining traction, and the future of the euro appears less precarious. But if one steps back to view the scene with a broader perspective, the portrait darkens. From slower emerging market growth to risk in China’s shadow banking sector to weak internal demand in the southern part of the euro area, the steady recovery of the global economy is hardly a sure bet. Unfinished economic and financial policy reforms litter the post-2008 landscape. A renewed commitment to improving the resilience of the global economy from domestic leaders and international financial governance institutions is critical. Read more »

Wherefore Art Thou ASEAN? Typhoon Haiyan’s Teachable Moment

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
A survivor carries plastic jugs as he searches for fresh water in an area devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippine city of Tacloban on November 18, 2013 (Damir Sagolj/Courtesy Reuters). A survivor carries plastic jugs as he searches for fresh water in an area devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippine city of Tacloban on November 18, 2013 (Damir Sagolj/Courtesy Reuters).

Below is a guest post by Jeffrey Wrightresearch associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program.

On November 8, Typhoon Haiyan blasted through the heart of the Philippines, leaving thousands dead and the country’s midsection flattened. One of the most powerful storms in recorded history, Haiyan carved a path of destruction reminiscent of the Asian tsunami in 2004 that demolished Indonesia’s Aceh province and other coastal areas in the Bay of Bengal. Similar to that disaster, the poorest citizens bore the brunt of calamity in the archipelago, their matchstick homes and enterprises reduced to rubble. Read more »

Customary International Law: Can UN Guidelines Affect Domestic Laws?

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
In 2004, people line up for entry into the U.S. Supreme Court where justices determined that executions of teenage killers are unconstitutionally cruel and unusual. In their decision, the court took into account the practice of countries around the world (Kevin Lamarque/Courtesy Reuters). In 2004, people line up for entry into the U.S. Supreme Court where justices determined that executions of teenage killers are unconstitutionally cruel and unusual. In their decision, the court took into account the practice of countries around the world (Kevin Lamarque/Courtesy Reuters).

Below is a guest post by Martin Willner, research associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program.

More often than not, when we think about customs and laws, we think of them as two distinct categories. Customs are encouraged, but optional: replying to an RSVP request, writing a thank-you note, shaking hands. Laws are mandatory: stopping at red lights, paying taxes, going to jury duty. As Kipling might put it, custom is custom and law is law and never the twain shall meet. Read more »