Stewart M. Patrick

The Internationalist

Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

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Showing posts for "International Cooperation"

Guaranteeing That Our Medicines Are Safe: Building a Global Coalition of Regulators

by Stewart M. Patrick
FDA Building 21 stands behind the sign at the campus's main entrance (Courtesy of the United States Food and Drug Administration). FDA Building 21 stands behind the sign at the campus's main entrance (Courtesy of the United States Food and Drug Administration).

Coauthored with Jeffrey Wright, research associate in the International Institutions and Global Governance program.

Two decades ago, the vast majority of legal drugs consumed in the United States were produced domestically. Today, 80 percent of the active ingredients in medicines used by Americans are fabricated abroad. Home-grown medicines industries have exploded in developing countries like Brazil, India and China. As a result, medicines are compounded many times and cross multiple borders before they reach U.S. pharmacy shelves. Domestic oversight agencies, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are therefore unable to supervise medicines’ production from start to finish, and many foreign counterpart authorities struggle to monitor and enforce adequate standards. Read more »

Good Enough Global Governance

by Stewart M. Patrick
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is seen at the podium of the General Assembly Hall (Mark Garten/UN Photo). Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is seen at the podium of the General Assembly Hall (Mark Garten/UN Photo).

International cooperation is increasingly taking place outside formal institutions, as frustrated actors turn to informal groups and ad hoc venues. The resulting clutter may be unsightly, but it’s here to stay—so the challenge is to make it work as well as possible. Read my latest article in Foreign Affairs, where I argue for good enough global governance. Available in print or online here.

Global Governance 2014: What to Look for in the Year Ahead

by Stewart M. Patrick
Participants at the G20 Summit in St. Petersburg, September 2013. (Photo: Dimitar Dilkoff/Courtesy Reuters) Participants at the G20 Summit in St. Petersburg, September 2013. (Photo: Dimitar Dilkoff/Courtesy Reuters)

In 2014, beyond watching triple salchows at the Sochi Olympics and bouncing brazucas at the World Cup, the world has a lot on its plate. Today on CFR.org, I highlight the major events at which the international community will attempt to tackle some of today’s most critical challenges. I outline how the coming year’s major summits will attempt to secure nuclear weapons, regulate the Internet, revive global trade, jumpstart economic growth, protect indigenous peoples worldwide and arrest climate change. Read the entire article here.

Latin America Charts Its Own Course: Reflections on the Mexico City CoC Meeting

by Stewart M. Patrick
Secretary General of the OAS José Miguel Insulza delivers a keynote speech at the Council of Councils Fifth Regional Conference in Mexico City, at a dinner hosted in the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs. November 25, 2013. Secretary General of the OAS José Miguel Insulza delivers a keynote speech at the Council of Councils Fifth Regional Conference in Mexico City, at a dinner hosted in the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs. November 25, 2013.

For more than two centuries the United States has loomed—for good and ill—over its southern neighbors. But that longstanding hegemonic role is fading. After two decades of robust growth and democratic consolidation, Latin America is increasingly charting its own course, not only in the hemisphere but, increasingly, around the globe. The diverse and dynamic region below the Rio Grande may still be America’s “backyard”, but it’s no backwater. And it’s evident that the United States is only beginning to adjust to these realities. Read more »

Typhoon Haiyan and Global Disaster Readiness

by Stewart M. Patrick

It will take months to fully understand the human and economic losses brought about by Typhoon Haiyan, which struck the Philippines on November 8. But at its most basic level, this occurrence underscores the importance of disaster preparedness and has spurred an important conversation about what can and cannot be done in the wake of natural disaster. Here I outline three things to know about disaster preparedness and relief. Read more »

Looking Past the Inbox: Report of the Oxford Martin Commission for Future Generations

by Stewart M. Patrick
World Trade Organization (WTO) Director-General Pascal Lamy looks on during his "Commandeur de la Legion d'Honneur" award ceremony at the Elysee Palace in Paris, May 31, 2013 (Benoit Tessier/Courtesy Reuters). World Trade Organization (WTO) Director-General Pascal Lamy looks on during his "Commandeur de la Legion d'Honneur" award ceremony at the Elysee Palace in Paris, May 31, 2013 (Benoit Tessier/Courtesy Reuters).

Every year, it seems, a new group of eminences grises issues a report deploring the state of the world and purporting to offer a roadmap out of our predicament. These documents tend to be short on imagination and substance. A welcome exception is Now for the Long Term, the recently-released final report of the Oxford Martin Commission for Future Generations. Its focus is a question that has long bedeviled policymakers: How can one persuade political actors—national governments, international organizations, corporations, and private citizens—to shift their frame of reference from immediate demands and present desires to the requirements of a stable, prosperous, and sustainable future? Read more »

Europe’s Future—and the World’s: Highlights From the Rome CoC Meeting

by Stewart M. Patrick
Rome's ancient forum lies at the heart of the Italian capital. The Council of Councils Third Regional Conference took place in Rome on September 8-10, 2013 (Stewart Patrick). Rome's ancient forum lies at the heart of the Italian capital. The Council of Councils Third Regional Conference took place in Rome on September 8-10, 2013 (Stewart Patrick).

Last month in Rome CFR cosponsored the first European meeting of the Council of Councils (CoC), a global network of twenty-four prominent think tanks. The setting provided an fitting backdrop to discuss the yawning chasm between today’s surging global threats and the anemic multilateral defenses designed to address them. We met in the gleaming Italian Foreign Ministry, but the parlous state of global governance recalled the crumbling pillars and walls of the nearby Forum and Coliseum—the structures of a once mighty empire laid low by time and change. Read more »

Start Spreading the News: Can Cities Govern the World?

by Stewart M. Patrick
Mayors (L- R) Eckart Wurzner of Heidelberg, Franklyn Tau of Johannesburg, Won Soon Park of Seoul, Eduardo Paes of Rio de Janeiro, Michael Bloomberg of New York, Babatunde Fashola of Lagos, Gilberto Kassab of Sao Paulo and Eduardo Macri of Buenos Aires pose for picture during the Rio+C40 Megacity Mayors Taking Action on Climate Change event in Rio de Janeiro (Sergio Moraes/ Courtesy Reuters). Mayors (L- R) Eckart Wurzner of Heidelberg, Franklyn Tau of Johannesburg, Won Soon Park of Seoul, Eduardo Paes of Rio de Janeiro, Michael Bloomberg of New York, Babatunde Fashola of Lagos, Gilberto Kassab of Sao Paulo and Eduardo Macri of Buenos Aires pose for picture during the Rio+C40 Megacity Mayors Taking Action on Climate Change event in Rio de Janeiro (Sergio Moraes/ Courtesy Reuters).

Benjamin Barber doesn’t just love cities. He’s convinced they hold the secret to effective, democratic global governance. As nation-states and international institutions flail in addressing transnational issues, today’s dynamic urban centers are poised to fill the breach. Such is the message of Barber’s lively and provocative new book, If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities. He overstates his case, but his arguments are original and thought-provoking. Read more »

The 2013 Nobel Message: Hold the Line Against Chemical Weapons

by Stewart M. Patrick
Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Director General Ahmet Uzumcu speaks during a news conference in The Hague October 11, 2013. The OPCW, which is overseeing the destruction's of Syria's arsenal, won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Norwegian Nobel Committee on Friday. Set up in 1997 to eliminate all chemicals weapons worldwide, its mission gained critical importance this year after a sarin gas strike in the suburbs of Damascus killed more than 1,400 people in August (Michel Kooren/Courtesy Reuters). Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Director General Ahmet Uzumcu speaks during a news conference in The Hague October 11, 2013. The OPCW, which is overseeing the destruction's of Syria's arsenal, won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Norwegian Nobel Committee on Friday. Set up in 1997 to eliminate all chemicals weapons worldwide, its mission gained critical importance this year after a sarin gas strike in the suburbs of Damascus killed more than 1,400 people in August (Michel Kooren/Courtesy Reuters).

In awarding this year’s Peace Prize to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the Norwegian Nobel Committee had three clear objectives. The first was to reinforce the global taboo against chemical weapons, violated by the large-scale sarin gas attack on civilians in the Damascus suburbs on August 21, which the Obama Administration says was launched by Syrian government forces. The second was to bolster the work of OPCW inspectors newly arrived in Syria as they seek to locate, quarantine, and destroy that country’s one thousand ton arsenal. The third was to chastise international laggards, including the United States and Russia, who have failed eliminate their remaining stockpiles of these horrific weapons. Read more »

Missing the Boat to Indonesia: Shortchanging a Strategic Partner

by Stewart M. Patrick
Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono shakes hands with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry during a U.S.-Indonesia bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit in Nusa Dua, on the Indonesian resort island of Bali October 8, 2013 (Beawiharta/ Courtesy Reuters). Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono shakes hands with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry during a U.S.-Indonesia bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit in Nusa Dua, on the Indonesian resort island of Bali October 8, 2013 (Beawiharta/ Courtesy Reuters).

An unfortunate casualty of President Obama’s cancelled trip to Asia was the missed opportunity to cement stronger U.S. ties with Indonesia, the emerging giant of Southeast Asia. The bilateral relationship will survive, of course, as will the “comprehensive partnership” the two countries launched in 2010. But the president’s no-show for the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Bali deprived the United States of a symbolic occasion to highlight how much unites these two boisterous democracies. It also sowed doubts among Indonesian elites about how seriously they should take the U.S. “pivot” to Asia, at a time when the United States and China are offering competing visions of the region’s future. The Obama administration should recall that the key to success in diplomacy (as in life, according to Woody Allen) is mostly just showing up. Read more »