Stewart M. Patrick

The Internationalist

Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

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Showing posts for "Resource Curse"

Extracting Justice: Battling Corruption in Resource-Rich Africa

by Stewart M. Patrick and Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Local residents' clothes dry over the gas pipelines running through the Eleme community near the city of Port Harcourt, a major Nigerian oil hub in the country's southeast. Local residents' clothes dry over the gas pipelines running through the Eleme community near the city of Port Harcourt, a major Nigerian oil hub in the country's southeast (Akintunde Akinleye/Courtesy Reuters).

Coauthored with Isabella Bennett, assistant director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program. Read more »

Governing the Resource Curse: Advancing Transparency

by Guest Blogger for Stewart M. Patrick
Smoke rises after a blast in a quarry at the Ariab mine September 28, 2011. The Ariab mine in east Sudan's Red Sea state, the country's largest single gold mining operation, is run by a partnership between Sudan's government and Canada's La Mancha. (Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Courtesy Reuters) Smoke rises after a blast in a quarry at the Ariab mine September 28, 2011. The Ariab mine in east Sudan's Red Sea state, the country's largest single gold mining operation, is run by a partnership between Sudan's government and Canada's La Mancha. (Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Courtesy Reuters)

Below is a guest post by Alexandra Kerr, program coordinator in the International Institutions and Global Governance program.

Ahead of the G8 summit this June, economist Paul Collier remarked that “instead of preaching to poor countries or promising to double aid, which we never did anyway, the idea now is… to put [our] own house in order, in ways that are good for us and also good for Africa.” Prefacing the summit’s strong focus on transparency, Collier’s statement touches on a recent series of international actions that shift the approach to solving the problem of corruption in the extractives industry. Where countries with natural resource abundance have often been scrutinized for failure to turn their endowments into sustained wealth for their populations, the onus is now on the companies that partner with these states to extract natural resources, to instigate change. Consequently, a new paradigm is emerging wherein the extractives industry is increasingly accountable for its financial transactions—which, in remaining largely ungoverned, have contributed significantly to the “resource curse.” At the heart of this shift, transparency is taking center stage. Read more »