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Renewing America

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Showing posts for "Education and Human Capital"

Congress’s Job Training Overhaul: A Modest Step in the Right Direction

by Guest Blogger for Edward Alden
Ironworker apprentices welding skills Wheeling West Virginia Ironworker apprentices (L-R) Ian Welshhans, Daniel Truax and Jason Taylor practice their welding skills during a class at the Ironworkers Local 549 training facility in Wheeling, West Virginia (Jason Cohn/Courtesy Reuters).

This is a guest post by Robert Maxim, research associate, competitiveness and foreign policy, for the Council on Foreign Relations studies program.

Any bill that receives the support of both Ted Cruz and Harry Reid is notable in its own right. When that bill takes steps to streamline the complex web of U.S. worker training programs, it is a genuine achievement for a Congress that gridlocks on even the most mundane tasks. Read more »

Born in 1988. Sorry

by Renewing America Staff
Graduating student Abel Charron hire me mortar board USC School Cinematic Arts commencement University Southern California Graduating student Abel Charron displays a "Hire me" sign written on his mortar board before USC School of Cinematic Arts commencement (Mario Anzuoni/Courtesy Reuters).

Can the year you are born dictate how much you make or how healthy you are? In a new column for Bloomberg View, CFR Adjunct Senior Fellow Peter Orszag explains how individuals who enter the workforce during times of high unemployment have lower wages and poorer health outcomes than those who began working in better economic conditions. Most notably, this pattern affects members of the same generation who were born only a few years apart. Over the course of a career, this can result in some workers earning up to $100,000 less than others of the same generation.

Labor’s Digital Displacement

by Michael Spence
3D printer sculpture Hanover Germany A 3D printer produces a sculpture at the CeBit computer fair in Hanover, Germany (Fabrizio Bensch/Courtesy Reuters).

Digital technologies are once again transforming global value chains and, with them, the structure of the global economy. What do businesses, citizens, and policymakers need to know as they scramble to keep up? Read more »

How to Fill the Skills Gap: Bring Back Apprenticeships

by Guest Blogger for Edward Alden
Yaun Smith, a senior, talks about his class's assembly line to make a s’more as a class project as part of the Project Lead the Way class at Bradley Tech High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Darren Hauck/Courtesy Reuters). Yaun Smith, a senior, talks about his class's assembly line to make a s’more as a class project as part of the Project Lead the Way class at Bradley Tech High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Darren Hauck/Courtesy Reuters).

This is a guest post by Robert Maxim, research associate, competitiveness and foreign policy, for the Council on Foreign Relations studies program.

Manufacturing is growing in the United States, but many companies claim that they face a “skills gap.” These companies have unfilled vacancies, but say that unemployed workers and recent high school graduates do not have the technical knowledge needed to fill them. Read more »

President Obama Should Fix the H-1B Program on His Own

by Edward Alden
Members of the audience listen to U.S. President Barack Obama as he participates in an event on immigration reform in San Francisco, November 25, 2013. (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters) Members of the audience listen to U.S. President Barack Obama as he participates in an event on immigration reform in San Francisco, November 25, 2013. (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters)

With House Republicans increasingly looking like they will again block immigration reform this year, pressure is growing on President Obama to use his executive authority to block further deportations of most unauthorized immigrants. I have an additional suggestion: use that same executive authority to expand admission of highly-educated temporary migrants to help boost the U.S. economy. Read more »

The Real Problem With the ‘Doc Fix’

by Renewing America Staff
Doctor Stephen Hippler treats patient Don Roth at his office in Peoria, Illinois (Jim Young/Courtesy Reuters). Doctor Stephen Hippler treats patient Don Roth at his office in Peoria, Illinois (Jim Young/Courtesy Reuters).

After failing to find a permanent solution, Congress is poised to pass another one-year patch to prevent major cutbacks to doctors who treat Medicare patients. In a new column for Bloomberg View, CFR Adjunct Senior Fellow Peter Orszag argues that healthcare providers are already anticipating a shift toward a system based on value of care, not volume of services. A responsible Congress would pass permanent legislation clearing the path for that shift.

Volkswagen’s Tennessee Gambit: Who’s Afraid of the Big, Bad Union?

by Edward Alden
The Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga ,Tennessee, is shown (Billy Weeks /Courtesy Reuters). The Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga ,Tennessee, is shown (Billy Weeks /Courtesy Reuters).

I have long been a strong advocate of foreign investment in the United States, and have argued against discriminatory tax rules, short-sighted security restrictions, or other government measures that discourage foreign companies. Now Volkswagen, the German carmaker, has given me one more reason to like foreign investors; the company could play a role in changing what has become a self-destructive anti-union ideology that permeates too much of American business and political culture. Read more »

Marrying Your Equal Boosts Inequality

by Renewing America Staff
U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class John Chen, 23, from Lakehurst, New Jersey, kisses his new bride Victoria Chan, 25, from Manhattan, as they pose for photographers after they were married in a civil ceremony at New York City's Office of the City Clerk (Mike Segar/Courtesy Reuters). U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class John Chen, 23, from Lakehurst, New Jersey, kisses his new bride Victoria Chan, 25, from Manhattan, as they pose for photographers after they were married in a civil ceremony at New York City's Office of the City Clerk (Mike Segar/Courtesy Reuters).

Americans are increasingly marrying people of similar income and educational backgrounds. In a new column for Bloomberg, CFR Adjunct Senior Fellow Peter Orszag discusses the effects of this phenomenon, including increased inequality, changes in women’s participation in the workforce, and reduced geographical mobility.

The New GOP Immigration Principles: A Historic Shift

by Edward Alden
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) speaks at his news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington January 16, 2014 (Yuri Gripas/Courtesy Reuters). U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) speaks at his news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington January 16, 2014 (Yuri Gripas/Courtesy Reuters).

The decision yesterday by House Republicans to release a broad set of principles for immigration reform may or may not lead to successful legislation this year. There are still many political and substantive hurdles to overcome to reach a bipartisan deal. But regardless, the announcement should be recognized for what it is – a huge and consequential change in the Republican Party’s approach to immigration reform. Read more »

New Harvard Study: U.S. Social Mobility Is Not Decreasing

by Rebecca Strauss
Jason Howe and Adrian Perez (L) hold their one-year-old twin daughters Clara (R) and Olivia at a playground in West Hollywood, California (Lucy Nicholson/Courtesy Reuters). Jason Howe and Adrian Perez (L) hold their one-year-old twin daughters Clara (R) and Olivia at a playground in West Hollywood, California (Lucy Nicholson/Courtesy Reuters).

There is no question that income inequality has been increasing since the 1970s in most of the world. And it has been the general assumption that as inequality went up, class mobility between generations would go down. This relationship, cleverly named the “Great Gatsby Curve,”  was thought to hold across nations, and previous studies about domestic U.S. trends had reinforced that conclusion. Read more »