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Renewing America

Ideas and initiatives for rebuilding American economic strength.

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Showing posts for "Education and Human Capital"

President Obama Should Fix the H-1B Program on His Own

by Edward Alden
Members of the audience listen to U.S. President Barack Obama as he participates in an event on immigration reform in San Francisco, November 25, 2013. (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters) Members of the audience listen to U.S. President Barack Obama as he participates in an event on immigration reform in San Francisco, November 25, 2013. (Jason Reed/Courtesy Reuters)

With House Republicans increasingly looking like they will again block immigration reform this year, pressure is growing on President Obama to use his executive authority to block further deportations of most unauthorized immigrants. I have an additional suggestion: use that same executive authority to expand admission of highly-educated temporary migrants to help boost the U.S. economy. Read more »

The Real Problem With the ‘Doc Fix’

by Renewing America Staff
Doctor Stephen Hippler treats patient Don Roth at his office in Peoria, Illinois (Jim Young/Courtesy Reuters). Doctor Stephen Hippler treats patient Don Roth at his office in Peoria, Illinois (Jim Young/Courtesy Reuters).

After failing to find a permanent solution, Congress is poised to pass another one-year patch to prevent major cutbacks to doctors who treat Medicare patients. In a new column for Bloomberg View, CFR Adjunct Senior Fellow Peter Orszag argues that healthcare providers are already anticipating a shift toward a system based on value of care, not volume of services. A responsible Congress would pass permanent legislation clearing the path for that shift.

Volkswagen’s Tennessee Gambit: Who’s Afraid of the Big, Bad Union?

by Edward Alden
The Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga ,Tennessee, is shown (Billy Weeks /Courtesy Reuters). The Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga ,Tennessee, is shown (Billy Weeks /Courtesy Reuters).

I have long been a strong advocate of foreign investment in the United States, and have argued against discriminatory tax rules, short-sighted security restrictions, or other government measures that discourage foreign companies. Now Volkswagen, the German carmaker, has given me one more reason to like foreign investors; the company could play a role in changing what has become a self-destructive anti-union ideology that permeates too much of American business and political culture. Read more »

Marrying Your Equal Boosts Inequality

by Renewing America Staff
U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class John Chen, 23, from Lakehurst, New Jersey, kisses his new bride Victoria Chan, 25, from Manhattan, as they pose for photographers after they were married in a civil ceremony at New York City's Office of the City Clerk (Mike Segar/Courtesy Reuters). U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class John Chen, 23, from Lakehurst, New Jersey, kisses his new bride Victoria Chan, 25, from Manhattan, as they pose for photographers after they were married in a civil ceremony at New York City's Office of the City Clerk (Mike Segar/Courtesy Reuters).

Americans are increasingly marrying people of similar income and educational backgrounds. In a new column for Bloomberg, CFR Adjunct Senior Fellow Peter Orszag discusses the effects of this phenomenon, including increased inequality, changes in women’s participation in the workforce, and reduced geographical mobility.

The New GOP Immigration Principles: A Historic Shift

by Edward Alden
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) speaks at his news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington January 16, 2014 (Yuri Gripas/Courtesy Reuters). U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) speaks at his news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington January 16, 2014 (Yuri Gripas/Courtesy Reuters).

The decision yesterday by House Republicans to release a broad set of principles for immigration reform may or may not lead to successful legislation this year. There are still many political and substantive hurdles to overcome to reach a bipartisan deal. But regardless, the announcement should be recognized for what it is – a huge and consequential change in the Republican Party’s approach to immigration reform. Read more »

New Harvard Study: U.S. Social Mobility Is Not Decreasing

by Rebecca Strauss
Jason Howe and Adrian Perez (L) hold their one-year-old twin daughters Clara (R) and Olivia at a playground in West Hollywood, California (Lucy Nicholson/Courtesy Reuters). Jason Howe and Adrian Perez (L) hold their one-year-old twin daughters Clara (R) and Olivia at a playground in West Hollywood, California (Lucy Nicholson/Courtesy Reuters).

There is no question that income inequality has been increasing since the 1970s in most of the world. And it has been the general assumption that as inequality went up, class mobility between generations would go down. This relationship, cleverly named the “Great Gatsby Curve,”  was thought to hold across nations, and previous studies about domestic U.S. trends had reinforced that conclusion. Read more »

Is There a Skills Gap? It’s Less Clear-Cut Than You Think

by Rebecca Strauss
Case worker Jessica Yon discusses job eligibility for unemployed people at a jobs center in San Francisco, California (Robert Galbraith/Courtesy Reuters). Case worker Jessica Yon discusses job eligibility for unemployed people at a jobs center in San Francisco, California (Robert Galbraith/Courtesy Reuters).

Closing the “skills gap” is high on the list of priorities for Washington policymakers. But the debate behind the skills gaps—whether it exists, how large it might be, and what to do about it—is much less clear-cut than a casual reading of the papers would suggest. Read more »

Space Exploration and U.S. Competitiveness

by Steven J. Markovich
With the Earth in the background, the SpaceX Dragon commercial cargo craft is seen as it is grappled by the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm (Photo provided by NASA/Courtesy Reuters). With the Earth in the background, the SpaceX Dragon commercial cargo craft is seen as it is grappled by the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm (Photo provided by NASA/Courtesy Reuters).

The Space Race of the 1960s spurred groundbreaking investments in research and education, inspiring a generation of Americans to enter the fields of science and engineering. These investments not only propelled the United States to preeminence in space exploration, but also planted the seeds for future innovation and economic competitiveness in many industries. A new backgrounder, Space Exploration and U.S. Competitiveness, explores the advancements produced by the U.S. space program, and discusses the challenges and opportunities that the program faces today.

Foreign Student Numbers Growing: The Good News and the Missed Opportunities

by Edward Alden
A student walks along Boston University's campus in Boston, Massachusetts (Jessica Rinaldi/Courtesy Reuters). A student walks along Boston University's campus in Boston, Massachusetts (Jessica Rinaldi/Courtesy Reuters).

While it is easy to despair at the many failings of the U.S. political process, it is important sometimes to celebrate the amazing resilience of American society. My cause today is the latest annual Open Doors report from the Institute of International Education, which examines foreign students studying at American universities and U.S. students studying abroad. The encouraging news is that last year nearly 820,000 international students attended U.S. colleges and universities, a record high and an increase of 7 percent over the previous year. New enrollments were up 10 per cent. That’s nearly a million smart young people who will either remain in the United States after they graduate and strengthen this country, or return home and bring with them the values and skills they learned at some of the world’s greatest schools. Read more »

Student Loans and U.S. Prosperity

by Steven J. Markovich
A student walks on the campus of San Francisco State University (Robert Galbraith/Courtesy Reuters). A student walks on the campus of San Francisco State University (Robert Galbraith/Courtesy Reuters).

Sticker shock was rampant among many freshmen in the class of 2017. The annual price of a private four-year university is now edging toward $60,000. As a result, federal student loans will play a key role in allowing millions of students to afford college. However, as CFR Contributing Editor Steven J. Markovich notes in his new Renewing America backgrounder Student Loans and U.S. Prosperity “many graduates are concerned about encountering a weak job market and the consequences that lingering debt may have on their financial futures.”