CFR Presents

Renewing America

Ideas and initiatives for rebuilding American economic strength.

Morning Brief: Hopes for U.S. Manufacturing Resurgence

by Jonathan Masters Wednesday, January 18, 2012

U.S. manufacturing employment has risen faster than in any other leading developed economy since the start of the recovery, feeding hopes the country is beginning a sustained manufacturing resurgence (FT). At just under twelve million workers, employment levels are still down roughly two million since before the recession. But Adam Davidson, reporting for the Atlantic, shows why the increased automation of U.S. manufacturing makes it unlikely that the industry will ever reach its former employment levels, especially for unskilled workers. Read more »

A Time for Restructuring

by Edward Alden Tuesday, January 17, 2012
President Barack Obama listens to reports during a meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness in October 2011 (Jonathan Ernst/Courtesy Reuters). President Barack Obama listens to reports during a meeting of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness in October 2011 (Jonathan Ernst/Courtesy Reuters).

CFR’s Renewing America initiative is premised on the simple idea that the United States’ ability to influence world events rests on a robust, competitive economy. If economic growth remains anemic and long-term problems continue to go unaddressed, then America’s foreign policy capacity will falter. The United States will gradually lose its still unmatched ability to influence friends and adversaries, to shape international institutions, and ultimately to project its military power to defends vital national interests. Read more »

Morning Brief: House GOP to Vote on Debt Ceiling Hike

by Jonathan Masters Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Debt and Deficits

House GOP to Vote on Debt Ceiling Hike

House Republicans are set to open the second session of Congress this week by voting on a resolution disapproving of the president’s proposed debt ceiling increase of $1.2 billion (Roll Call). The vote is seen as largely symbolic, and unlikely to pass both chambers. Read more »