Varun Sivaram

Energy, Security, and Climate

CFR experts examine the science and foreign policy surrounding climate change, energy, and nuclear security.

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Showing posts for "Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram"

India Makes Progress on Solar, But Barriers Remain

by Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram
A worker cleans photovoltaic solar panels inside a solar power plant at Raisan village near Gandhinagar, in the western Indian state of Gujarat (Reuters/Amit Dave) A worker cleans photovoltaic solar panels inside a solar power plant at Raisan village near Gandhinagar, in the western Indian state of Gujarat (Reuters/Amit Dave)

This guest post is co-authored by Sarang Shidore, a visiting scholar at the LBJ School at the University of Texas at Austin, and Joshua Busby, associate professor of public affairs at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the LBJ School at UT Austin. Read more »

Climate Change Could Enhance Risk of Conflict

by Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram
A Syrian man carries a water container as he is accompanied by a woman at a refugee camp in the Turkish border town of Yayladagi (Reuters/Umit Bektas) A Syrian man carries a water container as he is accompanied by a woman at a refugee camp in the Turkish border town of Yayladagi (Reuters/Umit Bektas)

This is a guest post by Joshua Busby, Associate Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin and author of the CFR discussion paper, Water and U.S. National Security. Read more »

Under Trump, Private Sector May Lead U.S. Climate Action

by Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram
The Googleplex, Google's corporate headquarters, generates much of its power from rooftop solar installations (Reuters/Erin Siegel) The Googleplex, Google's corporate headquarters, generates much of its power from rooftop solar installations (Reuters/Erin Siegel)

This post is authored by Shayle Kann, the head of GTM Research and Senior Vice President at Greentech Media: a Wood Mackenzie Business.

As the inauguration of President Donald Trump approaches, the future of federal action on energy and climate change remains highly uncertain. And although nothing is set in stone, there is mounting evidence that the new administration will drastically change course from the path set out by President Obama. Among the most recent news: Read more »

Climate Change and U.S. Leadership Under President Trump

by Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram
Donald Trump speaks to supporters in Charleston, West Virginia as the Republican presidential candidate in May 2016 (Reuters/Chris Tilley) Donald Trump speaks to supporters in Charleston, West Virginia as the Republican presidential candidate in May 2016 (Reuters/Chris Tilley)

This guest post was written by Lindsay Iversen, associate director of climate and resources at the Council on Foreign Relations.

In the week since Donald Trump’s election, the energy and environment community has struggled to come to grips with candidate Trump’s positions on climate change and energy policy—positions that were not deeply explored during the campaign or raised by the moderators in any of the debates. If enacted, the policies Trump has proposed will reverberate beyond American borders, with potentially serious ramifications for U.S. leadership in other foreign policy realms. Read more »

The International Energy Agency’s Hybrid Model

by Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram
IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol at the China-IEA side event during the Paris climate negotiations (IEA/George Kamiya)

This guest post is co-authored by Stewart Patrick, senior fellow and director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Naomi Egel, former research associate at the Council on Foreign Relations and doctoral student at Cornell University.  Read more »

What Will It Take to Turn Natural Gas Around in India?

by Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram
An LNG tanker from Qatar bound for Asia. Qatar is one of the major supplier of imported gas to India (Flickr). A Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker from Qatar. Qatar is one of the major suppliers of natural gas to India (Flickr).

This guest post is co-authored by Sarang Shidore, a visiting scholar at the LBJ School at the University of Texas at Austin, and Joshua Busby, associate professor of public affairs at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the LBJ School at UT Austin. Read more »

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve: A Policy Response to Oil Price Volatility?

by Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram
A maze of crude oil pipes and valves at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in Freeport, Texas (REUTERS/Richard Carson). A maze of crude oil pipes and valves at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in Freeport, Texas (REUTERS/Richard Carson).

This guest post is authored by Jason Bordoff, professor of professional practice and founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. For more on the causes, consequences, and policy implications of oil price volatility, read the report from a recent CFR workshop. Read more »

Now Comes the Hard Part: India’s Scope for Emissions Mitigation

by Guest blogger for Varun Sivaram
A private security guard walks between rows of photovoltaic solar panels inside a solar power plant at Raisan village in Gujarat (Reuters/Amit Dave) A private security guard walks between rows of photovoltaic solar panels inside a solar power plant at Raisan village in Gujarat (Reuters/Amit Dave)

This guest post is co-authored by Joshua Busby, Associate Professor, and Sarang Shidore, Consultant and Visiting Scholar, at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. For further analysis from the blog, see: “How India Could Achieve Its Audacious Solar Ambitions Read more »