CFR Presents

Women Around the World

CFR experts analyze women’s advancement globally.

The Women Driving International Development

by Guest Blogger for the Women and Foreign Policy Program Tuesday, January 10, 2017
MCC farm senegal Bineta Dioum Ba is a farmer in northern Senegal. Thanks to MCC’s compact with Senegal, women received user right titles to the land for the first time. (Jake Lyell/MCC)

Voices from the Field features contributions from scholars and practitioners highlighting new research, thinking, and approaches to development challenges. This article is authored by Dana J. Hyde, CEO of the Millennium Challenge Corporation.

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Trump Should Support the International Criminal Court

by Catherine Powell Monday, January 9, 2017
Bensouda bemba congo ICC Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), stands in The Hague, Netherlands, October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Michael Kooren

With the presidential transition underway, observers have noted with concern President-elect Trump’s hostility toward international institutions. As CFR Senior Fellow Stewart Patrick notes, “[T]here is one prediction we can take to the bank: The United Nations is going to get hammered.”

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Women Around the World: Year in Review

by Rachel Vogelstein Friday, January 6, 2017
Clinton women election Trump vote U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton waves to the crowd at a campaign rally on November 7, 2016, the final day of campaigning before the election. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Welcome to a special edition of “Women Around the World: This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy. This week’s post, highlighting 2016’s most significant stories about the status and rights of women and girls globally, was compiled with support from Becky Allen and Anne Connell.

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Women Around the World: This Week

by Rachel Vogelstein Thursday, December 22, 2016
India money banks women demonitization People wait for a bank to open to withdraw and deposit their money, after the scrapping of 500 and 1,000 Indian rupees currency notes, in Ahmedabad, India, December 5, 2016. REUTERS/Amit Dave

Welcome to “Women Around the World: This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy. This week’s post, covering from December 18 to December 24, was compiled with support from Becky Allen and Anne Connell.

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Women Around the World: This Week

by Rachel Vogelstein Monday, December 19, 2016
Rebel fighters and civilians gather near damaged buildings as they wait to be evacuated from a rebel-held sector of eastern Aleppo, Syria December 18, 2016. Picture taken December 18, 2016. REUTERS/Abdalrhman Ismail Rebel fighters and civilians gather near damaged buildings as they wait to be evacuated from a rebel-held sector of eastern Aleppo, Syria December 18, 2016. Picture taken December 18, 2016. REUTERS/Abdalrhman Ismail

Welcome to “Women Around the World: This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy. This week’s post, covering from December 11 to December 19, was compiled with support from Becky Allen, Anne Connell, and Lauren Hoffman.

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Women Around the World: This Week

by Rachel Vogelstein Friday, December 9, 2016
south korea merkel burqa ban veil nigeria People react after impeachment vote on South Korean President Park Geun-hye was passed, in front of the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea. The sign reads "Step Down Park Geun-hye". News1 via REUTERS

Welcome to “Women Around the World: This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy. This week’s post, covering from December 3 to December 10, was compiled with support from Becky Allen, Anne Connell, and Lauren Hoffman.

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Fighting Corruption by Combating Sexual Extortion

by Jamille Bigio and Lauren Hoffman Friday, December 9, 2016
women nepal saudi corruption sex extortion Two veiled Nepali women who reported to police that they were sexually exploited by a Saudi official while working as domestic laborers walk outside Nepal's embassy in New Delhi, India, September 9, 2015. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee

Today, December 9, is International Anti-Corruption Day, organized by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to fight corruption. As they report, “every year $1 trillion is paid in bribes while an estimated $2.6 trillion are stolen annually through corruption – a sum equivalent to more than 5 percent of the global GDP.” This year’s theme, “United Against Corruption,” highlights corruption as one of the largest impediments to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

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Women Around the World: This Week

by Rachel Vogelstein Friday, December 2, 2016
South Korea park president woman Protesters shout slogans at a protest calling South Korean President Park Geun-hye to step down, in Seoul, South Korea, November 19, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Welcome to “Women Around the World: This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy. This week’s post, covering November 25 to December 2, was compiled with support from Becky Allen, Anne Connell, and Lauren Hoffman.

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New Tools Increase Women’s Financial Inclusion in Nigeria

by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon Thursday, December 1, 2016
Women arrange produce for sale at a roadside market in Ojodu district in Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos August 19, 2016.  REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye - RTX2M43J Women arrange produce for sale at a roadside market in Ojodu district in Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos August 19, 2016. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye - RTX2M43J

Nigeria has been identified as one of eleven emerging economies with high growth potential for the coming decades. And yet, Nigeria is far from achieving the World Bank’s goal of universal financial access by 2020, with women comprising the majority of Nigeria’s “unbanked.” Only one-third of Nigerian women own a bank account, compared with more than half of Nigerian men, a stubborn gender gap that has grown, not shrunk, in recent years, from 7 percent in 2011 to 21 percent in 2014.

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Five Questions About Adolescent Girls in Emergencies

by Rachel Vogelstein and Anne Connell Tuesday, November 29, 2016
A young Syrian refugee girl peeks out from a tent at a refugee camp in al-Minieh, northern Lebanon, November 19, 2014. REUTERS/Omar Ibrahim A young Syrian refugee girl peeks out from a tent at a refugee camp in al-Minieh, northern Lebanon, November 19, 2014. REUTERS/Omar Ibrahim

The Five Questions Series is a forum for scholars, government officials, civil society leaders, and foreign policy practitioners to provide timely analysis of new developments related to the advancement of women and girls worldwide. This interview is with Dr. Holly G. Atkinson, Distinguished Medical Lecturer at the CUNY School of Medicine and Assistant Clinical Professor of Medical Education at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Judith Bruce, senior associate and policy analyst at the Population Council. Atkinson and Bruce are members of the Girls in Emergencies Collaborative, a multi-organization effort anchored by Omar Robles and Dale Buscher at the Women’s Refugee Commission to address the elevated risks adolescent girls face during humanitarian emergencies.

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